Elemental Analysis | Media Downloads | Other Redmond Products

Why is there a warning sticker on Redmond Clay?

Posted by on Nov 25, 2013 in clay questions answered, learning about clay | 1 comment

Why is there a warning sticker on Redmond Clay?

If you spend much time in California, you’re probably used to seeing warning signs about Proposition 65. They’re on display at restaurants, banks, gas stations, grocery stores, even Disneyland. But why is there a proposition 65 warning on Redmond Clay? What is Proposition 65? In spirit, prop 65 is a great idea: California lawmakers decided the public needs to know if their water and food supply contains toxic chemicals. So they compiled a list of 800 substances and required any business using the substances proclaim the use...

read more

Is it safe to store clay in plastic containers?

Posted by on Nov 8, 2012 in clay questions answered | 1 comment

Is it safe to store clay in plastic containers?

Last week, a customer wrote to ask us the best way to store hydrated Redmond Clay. Is it okay to store clay in plastic containers? It’s a question we hear often. Here’s the answer—along with a quick look at the reasons people ask. Recycled Information Most of what you’ve read about healing clays comes from a single source: A book called Our Earth, Our Cure by French naturopath Raymond Dextreit. Translated into English in 1974, the book is a gold mine of information about clay’s many uses—so good that each of the books (and,...

read more

What about the aluminum in Redmond Clay?

Posted by on Aug 20, 2012 in clay questions answered, learning about clay | 1 comment

Aluminum is one of the most abundant minerals on earth, accounting for roughly 8% of our planet’s crust. Every plant and animal alive contains a trace amount of aluminum, which has been associated with healthy cellular function and metabolic processes. Of course, recent studies linking aluminum to mental degeneration has left a lot of people wondering whether the FDA will change the “generally recognized as safe” label that has been applied to aluminum-based food additives. In the mean time, many people have concerns about aluminum in...

read more

Badly infected dog bite

Posted by on Jun 13, 2012 in customer stories | 0 comments

My daughter had a BAD dog bite and it was badly infected. The antibiotic ointments were not working and it was getting worse fast. I put the clay (in paste form)on her hand overnight (about 12 hours) and most of the infection was gone! The next night I did the same. No more infection and it is over half healed!!! Tonight should finish up the healing. Thank You!!! Thank You!!! I can not express my relief!!!

read more

Is Redmond Clay a Calcium Bentonite Clay?

Posted by on Jun 8, 2012 in clay questions answered | 8 comments

In 2006, as more and more people were returning to natural remedies, Perry Arledge published a book discussing ways clay has been used for centuries for health and beauty. The book, called Living Clay, includes a list of questions consumers might ask while choosing the source for their clay—questions we hear often enough we thought we should put the answers online to make your research easier. Is Redmond Clay a Calcium Bentonite Clay? This is one of the most common questions people have after reading Living Clay. Is Redmond Clay is a...

read more

Suffered from Heartburn and Reflux

Posted by on Apr 6, 2012 in customer stories | 0 comments

I have suffered from heartburn and reflux most of my adult life.  In the early 2000’s my doctor put me on Nexium.  It helped greatly.  Then my husband lost his job and insurance, so I stopped taking Nexium and went back to over the counter relief.  Last year I began taking Raditidine (Zantac) with my evening meal to help with the overnight relief, and 2 to 8 antacids during the day.  Then one day I went to Bread Beckers website to see if they had any new food prep videos.  One by the name of “Healing Power of Clay”...

read more

What makes Redmond Clay unique?

Posted by on Mar 26, 2012 in learning about clay | 0 comments

Most clay deposits are high in either sodium (sodium bentonite clay) or calcium (calcium bentonite clay). Redmond Clay comes from an unusual deposit, high in both sodium and calcium, which gives our clay a unique combination of properties. Redmond Clay has a strong pulling capacity, which helps draw bacteria out of the body, and it also has high swelling capacity, which helps it bind more effectively to toxins internally. Like other natural products, Redmond Clay benefits different people in different ways. One customer might tell us it cured...

read more

Amazingly Natural Toothpaste

Posted by on Mar 21, 2012 in features | 5 comments

Amazingly Natural Toothpaste

A new brand of natural toothpaste has a lot of people talking. Earthpaste is as natural a toothpaste as you’ll ever find, and it uses Redmond Clay as one of its few ingredients. Earthpaste’s list of ingredients is unique, but the things they left out are just as important. Most brands of toothpaste contain foaming agents like SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate), and chemicals like titanium dioxide to make the paste bright white. Not Earthpaste. It isn’t just safe to swallow — each ingredient in Earthpaste has been used to support healthy...

read more

How to prepare Redmond Clay

Posted by on Mar 21, 2012 in how to use Redmond Clay, videos | 3 comments

How to prepare Redmond Clay

Just what do you do with Redmond Clay once you get it? Watch this short clip for some beginner tips. Hydrated Redmond Clay is typically two parts water to one part clay. To prepare your clay, pour one 10-oz. jar of dry clay powder into a quart-size glass jar. Fill the empty 10-oz. container with water and pour it into the jar, then put the lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Add another 10-oz container of water to the mixture, shake it again, and leave it on your counter overnight. By morning, Redmond Clay will be fully hydrated...

read more

Using Redmond Clay externally

Posted by on Mar 21, 2012 in how to use Redmond Clay, videos | 30 comments

Using Redmond Clay externally

Even after 50 years, we still hear new ways people use Redmond Clay. Here are some of the most common, and most helpful. Clay as a Poultice Hydrated Redmond Clay can be applied externally as a poultice on cuts, bruises, insect bites, bee stings, boils, rashes, achy joints, acne, and burns. To apply a clay poultice, place a thick layer (¼ to 1 inch thick) over the affected area. Redmond Clay has tremendous drawing power, so it should be washed off before it dries completely– especially when used on burns or sensitive areas such...

read more